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  1. #16
    I can believe it and embrace it. Most people forget that feathers aren't the same as fur. They can insulate, but they can also cool down an animal a lot. They don't just heat an animal, and even large dinosaurs would have a sparse amount, like elephants, rhinos, and hippos.
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  2. #17
    Philosoraptor Urano Metria's Avatar
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    I wanna see a sauropod with a feather headdress.
    "Juvia lives for the ones that she loves! You've got to as well. If you have love in your life, you must keep on living!

  3. #18
    Predator X Pyrous's Avatar
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    this video goes really in-depth into the whole "all dinos had feathers" thing. It pretty much just goes over all the dino family groups, wich ones did have feathers, wich ones probably had feathers, and the odds of what dinos having feathers and what forms of feathers they might have had.
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  4. #19
    Philosoraptor robo-ve-tranic's Avatar
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    i do agree that most dinosaurs were some what featured but not all were featured

    invalid signiture space please refrain from saying goose otherwise the world might explode

  5. #20
    Philosoraptor John Jurgo's Avatar
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    It would be weird if certain dinosaurs turned out to have feathers, but I'd say its not completely out of the picture.

    #didntclicktheOPslinkedarticlecuzimlazyascrap

  6. #21
    Except for the last few inches of the tail, we have a complete scaly covering preserved for "Leonardo", the mummified sub-adult Brachylophosaurus. When you combine skin samples from different Lancian/Hell Creek mummies ("Dakota", Trachodon-mummy etc) you could say the same for Edmontosaurus.

  7. #22
    Remember that feathers were apparently a basal trait of dinosaurs, so any dinosaurs without feathers lost them at some point, rather than not having them in the first place.

  8. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Wallace View Post
    Remember that feathers were apparently a basal trait of dinosaurs, so any dinosaurs without feathers lost them at some point, rather than not having them in the first place.
    Possible, but several analyses, including a recent one incorporating Kulindadromeus, have come to the opposite conclusion = the last common ancestor of all Dinosauria was scaled with filamentous structures evolving multiple times during the Mesozoic.

    http://www.theguardian.com/science/2...ysis-concludes

    Link to paper, unfortunately behind a paywall = http://rsbl.royalsocietypublishing.o.../11/6/20150229

    What we'd really need to settle things one way or the other is a Triassic basal dinosauromorph preserved with either scales or protofeathers.
    Last edited by Ozraptor4; 06-27-2015 at 01:22 AM.

  9. #24
    Philosoraptor War Bear 112's Avatar
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    I'll believe it when I see proof for it... there's evidence pointing in both ways you know.

    While we all know raptors and such had feathers, the feathered triceratops is still just a theory based on a single specimen. There's even skin-impressions of some species, including tyrannosaurids and hadrosaurs, that suggest that they were not fully feathered.

  10. #25
    Forum Smart-**** DinoBear's Avatar
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    Almost all skin impressions from tyrannosaurs come from patches smaller than their own hands. The only exception to this that I know of is Tarbosaurus, with foot scales and a rumored throat impression, neither of which exactly disprove it having feathers. Perhaps they weren't as heavily feathered as, say, a snow owl.

  11. #26
    Also, tyrannosaur scales show signs of being derived from feathers (like the scales on birds' legs), rather than being normal reptilian scales.

  12. #27
    Philosoraptor _MaxPlays's Avatar
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    ^ this ^


  13. #28
    The first ever example of a plant-eating dinosaur with feathers and scales has been discovered in Russia. Previously only flesh-eating dinosaurs were known to have had feathers, so this new find raises the possibility that all dinosaurs could have been feathered.

  14. #29
    Hail Denmark! Bartbrink1996's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bestellen View Post
    The first ever example of a plant-eating dinosaur with feathers and scales has been discovered in Russia. Previously only flesh-eating dinosaurs were known to have had feathers, so this new find raises the possibility that all dinosaurs could have been feathered.
    That's awesome. You happen to have a link to the article?
    "No matter what the future may bring, some things will never change! Like the courage and daring of true heroes!" RIP Bionicle.

  15. #30
    Philosoraptor War Bear 112's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bestellen View Post
    The first ever example of a plant-eating dinosaur with feathers and scales has been discovered in Russia. Previously only flesh-eating dinosaurs were known to have had feathers, so this new find raises the possibility that all dinosaurs could have been feathered.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bartbrink1996 View Post
    That's awesome. You happen to have a link to the article?
    Would it be this artcle from 2014? .__.
    https://www.theguardian.com/science/...siberia-russia

    "For the last 20 years, huge numbers of fossils from China have dramatically demonstrated that large numbers of dinosaur species that were closely related to the birds had all manner of feathers on their bodies. However, a new find named Kulindadromeus from eastern Russia published today in Science, suggests that in fact feathers, or at least very feather-like structures may have been present in huge numbers of other species of dinosaur, including those which are from totally different branches of the dinosaurian family tree to the birds."



    Also, look at this widdle fuzzy cootie. .3.


    http://nypost.com/2016/04/02/4-feath...-know-existed/

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