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  1. #31
    Novaraptor Nadia's Avatar
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    So it is some kind of fossil mixing again? =/

  2. #32
    Note that the "horned" Oviraptor never existed. Until the 1970s, the only known oviraptorid skull available (to Western researchers at least) was from the holotype of Oviraptor philoceratops in the AMNH, discovered during the 1920s Chapman expeditions. The skull was thought to be reasonably complete, thus the apparent nasal horn was considered genuine.


    However, with the benefit on numerous additional oviraptorid material (although no new specimens of O. philoceratops itself have been formally identified), we now know that this skull is less complete than once thought (dark areas are missing) =


    Complete high-crested skulls previously assigned to Oviraptor are now thought to represent separate genera (Citipati, Rinchenia). So Oviraptor philoceratops may or may not have had a crest (it probably did), but it's skull is too incomplete to tell.


    Quote Originally Posted by Nadia View Post
    I have a Question about Oviraptors.

    When I was young I had many books with illustrations of horned Oviraptors, but at some point this was changed in new books would only have illustrations of chrested Oviraptors, mostly because someone found a non crushed chrested skull.

    But when did that happen and who found the Fossils of the chrested Oviraptor?

  3. #33
    Novaraptor Nadia's Avatar
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    Thx for answer Ozraptor4.

  4. #34
    Oh, and with regards to the effectiveness of the stegosaur thagomizer as a weapon =

    http://westerndigs.org/allosaurus-di...-fossil-shows/

    This Wyoming allosaur with a mangled pubis (mounted in the Glenrock Paleontological Museum) is a different individual to the already mentioned punctured vertebra which is from Utah (UMNH 10781). However, given that the Utah vert is a 1st caudal, the allosaur from which it came from was likely also hit in the groin. Stegosaurs seem to have gone for the nads...
    Last edited by Ozraptor4; 12-02-2014 at 09:08 PM.

  5. #35
    Very vague question (sort of)
    what evidence/data do we have for dromaeosaurids having feathers? I'm interested to look at the evidence (or any famous bits of evidence) I've researched a bit myself but I just want to know what data other people have.

  6. #36
    Feathers have been found preserved in specimens of Sinornithosaurus, Microraptor, and Changyuraptor and quill knobs (attachment points for wing feathers on the forelimbs) are known in Velociraptor. Phylogenetic bracketing would infer feathered dromaeosaurids even in the event that we lacked feathered specimens (assuming we still knew of feathered birds, oviraptorosaurs, etc.).

  7. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by albertonykus View Post
    Feathers have been found preserved in specimens of Sinornithosaurus, Microraptor, and Changyuraptor and quill knobs (attachment points for wing feathers on the forelimbs) are known in Velociraptor. Phylogenetic bracketing would infer feathered dromaeosaurids even in the event that we lacked feathered specimens (assuming we still knew of feathered birds, oviraptorosaurs, etc.).
    Thank you for the information, this was very helpful.
    It's interesting on one of the articles how most studies have denied their relation to birds: possible bias in those studies? (as in bias towards dinosaurs not being related to birds)
    The feather quill knobs especially stands out to me - it makes me wonder if bigger dromaeosaurids had feathers, this being supported by phylogenetic bracketing.

  8. #38
    There are a handful of biased holdouts who deny the dinosaurian origin of birds, but the contention alluded to in that paper is whether dromaeosaurids are more closely related to birds compared to some other groups of dinosaurs. We have many more species and specimens now to use in analysis that demonstrate this result more solidly than in the 90s.

  9. #39
    The Continental Lord Pangea's Avatar
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    How far north would dinosaurs like Tyrannosaurus, Ankylosaurus and maybe Triceratops possibly live? Just curious because I feel there may have been more arctic dinosaurs than we know of.

  10. #40
    Gold Member Flishster's Avatar
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    They could have gone as far north as Alaska, but considering they were all subtropical species them actually going that far north is unlikely.

  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flishster View Post
    They could have gone as far north as Alaska, but considering they were all subtropical species them actually going that far north is unlikely.
    with the exception of Edmontosaurus and Troodon there is proof that they lived as far south as Texas all the way up to Alaska. Well also Pachyrhinosaurus and Gorgosaurus (maybe even Albertosaurus).

  12. #42
    Remember that with as animals as large as some of the big dinosaurs, staying warm isn't much of a problem. Large dinosaurs could have easily survived in cold regions with minimal insulation.

  13. #43
    Hi, do you mind, I have a quick question?

    The raptors from the jurassic park movie seem to have different sources stating what size they are and what real raptor they are most closest to in size and resemble. The same with the show primeval, they are supposed to be deinonychus yet they look bigger in size.
    Could I request some clarification on what size these raptors are in resemblance to actual dinosaurs?
    This is mostly out of curiosity, and a need for accuracy, haha. X)


    Jurassic park raptor size;
    Some sources state they are 6 feet tall.




    Primeval raptor ; many people think this may be deinonychus;




  14. #44
    The JP raptors were much bigger than Deinonychus, which was roughly the size of a large dog. The JP raptors are closest to Utahraptor in size, although they don't resemble it at all.


  15. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Wallace View Post
    The JP raptors were much bigger than Deinonychus, which was roughly the size of a large dog. The JP raptors are closest to Utahraptor in size, although they don't resemble it at all.

    Ah I see, i thought deinonychus were only about waist high. What about the primeval raptors? They seem too large for deinonychus as well, a lot of people assume them to be deinonychus, I'm not sure though.

    I think a lot of people think deinonychus are the height of a man-ish, when I reality when we say man/-sized we meant in terms of mass, not in terms of height. Thanks for your response.

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