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  1. #1
    Philosoraptor Urano Metria's Avatar
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    How would living dinosaurs be received in the 21st century? THREAD 2

    Some of you might know that the whole reason I found out about Primal Carnage was when I bumped into this thread in the olden days

    http://archive.primalcarnage.com/vie...e18381fb006111

    This thread is basically continuing the discussion that went on for like 31 pages. How would dinosaurs survive or be presented in our century? What niches would they fill? Dino mounts anyone?




    btw this thread is intended for talk about prehistoric creatures so nobody calling me stupid for not mentioning living birds







    plz don't die thread, plz don't die thread
    "Juvia lives for the ones that she loves! You've got to as well. If you have love in your life, you must keep on living!”

  2. #2
    The one and only. Primitive's Avatar
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    Were they alongside us as we adapted into our modern selves? Did we clone them? It really depends on how they were brought back.

  3. #3
    Philosoraptor Urano Metria's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Primitive View Post
    Were they alongside us as we adapted into our modern selves? Did we clone them? It really depends on how they were brought back.
    I don't see why you can't give an opinion for all those scenarios





    Edit: but your first option doesn't really make sense. If we evolved alongside them we wouldn't be receiving them
    "Juvia lives for the ones that she loves! You've got to as well. If you have love in your life, you must keep on living!”

  4. #4
    Predator X Spinoraptyrex's Avatar
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    I think we would try to use them for recources at first. Breed certain species of horned/armored dinosaurs for their horns so stress on endangered species drops a little.
    Food might also be a good reason. Some species of dinosaurs grew very quickly, and we could feed them things we ourselves don't. I did always wonder how a Brachi-buger would taste like. Even without meat, they still lay lots of rather big eggs.
    After a while we would probably use the smaller ones as pets.
    I'm not entirely sure if a true zoo like setting would be viable, depending on how common dinosaurs have become across the world. But I'm sure that if they do make it, they won't try stupid ♥♥♥♥ like having a few wires act as a fence or creating hyrbrids. (at least not at first...)
    Like the JW plot, military use might come into play. Not really in the sence of sending rexes into battle and such things, but more going under the radar. Having small creatures trained to spy and even deliver items.
    If dinosaurs got into the wild, it would all depend on the species and location. They just need to find their niche and you'll have a population in no time.
    I don't expect see dinosaurs in work environments all that much, like modern day animals. Most things are automated anyway. The only job I can think of right now is to sniff out narcotics.

  5. #5
    Philosoraptor Urano Metria's Avatar
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    Pretty realistic opinion, but I still feel that they could have more uses in work environments. Who knows? Maybe feathers and pycnofibers will work just as well as fur in therapy
    "Juvia lives for the ones that she loves! You've got to as well. If you have love in your life, you must keep on living!”

  6. #6
    If we're talking about cloned dinosaurs, then we'd probably have the technology to make them (along with all other animals) essentially obsolete when it comes to directly benefiting us, so they'd basically be restricted to being curiosities or pets.

  7. #7
    Raptor Bait ExperiMUNt's Avatar
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    I don't think the dinosaurs would be AS big as they were, especially the giant long-necked sauropods. 65 million years ago there was way more oxygen in the air, which is what made the animals (and insects as well, yikes!) so huge! Of course they'd still be just as big, but maybe not to the gargantuan sizes. Sea dinosaurs (yES I KNOW THEY'RE NOT DINOSAURS SHHHH) could grow very large though (blue whales for example.) I remember watching a documentary explaining why and how those animals could get so big, I'll try and search it up again!

    I'd imagine it would be very hard to try and keep those animals contained in a certain environment, predators especially. It would make the wild world a whole lot more dangerous.
    "I can't seem to get the sizes just right.." - ExperiMUNt

  8. #8
    Novaraptor Merking's Avatar
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    If we would have non-avian dinosaurs today, people would look at them in zoos and citys and complain that they aren´t real dinosaurs because they are to small/to fat/to feathery/to beaked/to pink/not scary/to adapted/to loud/to stupid/not awesome.
    And basicly everything would be the same, just with far less mammals.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by ExperiMUNt View Post
    I don't think the dinosaurs would be AS big as they were, especially the giant long-necked sauropods. 65 million years ago there was way more oxygen in the air, which is what made the animals (and insects as well, yikes!) so huge! Of course they'd still be just as big, but maybe not to the gargantuan sizes. Sea dinosaurs (yES I KNOW THEY'RE NOT DINOSAURS SHHHH) could grow very large though (blue whales for example.) I remember watching a documentary explaining why and how those animals could get so big, I'll try and search it up again!

    I'd imagine it would be very hard to try and keep those animals contained in a certain environment, predators especially. It would make the wild world a whole lot more dangerous.
    Actually, oxygen had little to no effect on dinosaur sizes; the oxygen content was actually LOWER at some points during the Mesozoic than it is today.
    Also, you could just call "sea dinosaurs" sea reptiles, since that's what they were. They weren't related to dinosaurs in any way.

  10. #10
    Philosoraptor Urano Metria's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ExperiMUNt View Post
    Sea dinosaurs (yES I KNOW THEY'RE NOT DINOSAURS SHHHH) could grow very large though (blue whales for example.) I remember watching a documentary explaining why and how those animals could get so big, I'll try and search it up again!

    I'd imagine it would be very hard to try and keep those animals contained in a certain environment, predators especially. It would make the wild world a whole lot more dangerous.
    I think what you're looking for is that sea animals can get very large because the water supports their weight but on land they wouldn't survive because their weight would crush them


    Here is an example

    (It isn't completely accurate but it's the best I could find and serves it's purpose)

    First, most species of whale have very large bodies that weigh thousands of pounds.

    In fact the blue whale (the largest animal in existence) can weigh in excess of 150 tons and grow to be over 100 ft. long!

    Their bodies are not designed to hold that kind of weight on land, which is a non buoyant environment.

    After only a few minutes on land the whales own body weight would crush its organs without the buoyancy and weightlessness of the ocean to hold it up.
    "Juvia lives for the ones that she loves! You've got to as well. If you have love in your life, you must keep on living!”

  11. #11
    Yet, despite the lack of certain size limitations for marine vs terrestrial animals, the largest marine reptiles actually never surpassed the size of the largest terrestrial reptiles. The massive titanosaur sauropods in the 100+ tonne range were larger than the absolute largest marine reptile we know of: the Icthyosaur, Shastasaurus;



    Roughly the size of a sperm whale in length, and likely somewhat lighter: around 60-70 feet long, and likely around 40 or so tonnes in weight. Much below the sizes of large whales, and terrestrial sauropods.

    The next largest marine reptiles, outside of Shastasaurus's close relatives, would be the largest Pliosaurus species at around 45 feet long and maybe 30 or so tonnes, and the largest Mososaurus species, at up to 60 feet long and of somewhat lower mass than Pliosaurus.

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  12. #12
    Philosoraptor Urano Metria's Avatar
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    Even so, I'm guessing the best choice for an aquarium would be lariosaurus





    Jurassic Sea World!
    "Juvia lives for the ones that she loves! You've got to as well. If you have love in your life, you must keep on living!”

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